Germs

Have you been to Seattle’s Pike Place Market? It’s super touristy, but a fun place to spend a couple of hours checking out the various vendors (hello original Starbucks!). It turns out that, in addition to being the oldest public market in the USA, it’s also home to one of the germiest tourist attractions in the world. While walking past it, I realised what it was and decided to stop for a couple of pictures.

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North Fork Yachats River Covered Bridge

Leaving the small seaside town of Yachats, James and I headed into the countryside. After driving along a windy road surrounded by trees and fields for approximately 20 minutes, we reached our destination: the rustic and historic covered bridge I’d seen online.

Originally built in 1938 by veteran bridge builder Otis Hamer, this queenpost truss timber bridge is a sight to see.

At just over 42′ long, it’s one of the shortest in the state. I took this photo while peeking down the side of the bridge to the riverbank below.

Once you pass through the bridge, you’ve got to turn around and head back the way you came in. The property on the other side is private, with no through road.

I also learned that the North Fork Yachats River Covered Bridge has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places since 1979, which I think is pretty neat.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Gordon House

Late last week I saw an headline about a Frank Lloyd Wright house being acquired by a museum in New Hampshire, in the United States.

For those not familiar with Mr. Wright, he made a name for himself by (among many things) being an innovative architect who’s design focused on bridging humans and our natural surroundings – which makes that recent headline exciting for fans of his work and those interested in architecture.

For me, it reminded me that James and I unintentionally stumbled upon a FLW house in September and I still hadn’t posted about it!

Do you remember my posts about The Oregon Garden near Silverton a couple of months ago? If not, and you like flowers, you can find the posts here and here.

Anyway, on the edge of the garden property sits The Gordon House which is the only FLW house in the state. Because we a) didn’t know of its existence and therefore, b) didn’t prebook a tour, we were left to wander the grounds outside of the house.

It was eerily quiet. There wasn’t anyone else around and it felt like we shouldn’t be there. Do you ever get that sensation that you’re being watched? That’s how I felt.

The pathway was a carpet made of hazelnut shells, which was strangely satisfying to walk on.

Although I had seen a couple of figures in one of the windows, I decided to chance getting shooed away for a closer look and headed up the long driveway.

I decided to walk straight up to the entrance for a peek inside. What I wasn’t expecting was to interrupt a tour. After a very quick snap, I turned and quickly hurried back down the driveway.

I’ve spent most of my adult life wanting to visit a FLW property. It’s weird then that after all this time it felt a little letdown. Perhaps if we’re in the area ever again, I’ll plan ahead and book a tour. Surely being able to see the interior would improve the experience?

Have you ever been up close and experienced a Frank Lloyd Wright house?

Bonne journée!

Marla

That Night in the Tiki Bar

Across the street from our Portland motel was a fun looking tiki bar that screamed for us to check it out.

The decor inside The Alibi was kitschy and typically tiki bar-ish. Exactly what I was looking for.

I may have had one too many potent and ridiculously named Banana Hammocks. How could I say no to a tropical umbrella drink?

I was a bit unsure about it being a karaoke night, but it ended up being really fun singing along (off key, on my part) to the songs being performed.

If you’re in Portland’s Overlook neighbourhood, drop in see why this place is still going strong more than 70 years since it first opened.

Bonne journée!

Marla

The Oregon Garden

We visited the Oregon Garden earlier this week for a wander through the enormous grounds (80 acres!).

I’ve split my photos into 2 groups, and today we’ll start with the first.. it’s more muted than tomorrow’s group, but the plants and flowers are nowhere less beautiful.

I’m not sure what the above pod is, but the next photo shows what it looks like when they open up. They remind me of dandelions.

The Dogwood is the floral emblem of our province, British Columbia. I love its clean simplicity.

Anyone know what this is? I thought perhaps that it was a walnut, but I think the “pod” of walnuts are more shiny and less velvety?

Have you ever visited the Oregon Garden? If so, what did you think?

Bonne journée!

Marla

Tsunami Hazard Zones

While life on the Oregon Coast can be carefree and relaxing, a sobering reality is that much of it lies in tsunami hazard zones. It’s common for hotels and motels around the world to display fire evacuation maps in each room. On the Oregon Coast they go further by providing maps to safety zones on higher ground should a tsunami head towards land.

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Silverton Murals

The nearest city to our campsite was Silverton, which lies on the 45th Parallel (Vancouver, where we call home, is at the 49th).

The small city is named after the Silver Creek that runs through it. Human habitation of the area spreads back over 6000 years, and agriculture has been the main industry since the 19th century.

We ended up in Silverton to find a gas station, as the van was low on fuel. What brought us back the next day were the murals peppered throughout Silverton. I love me a good mural!

I’ve since learned that the Silverton Mural Society was modeled after mural successes of Chemainus, British Columbia. Like in Chemainus, the Silverton murals are a major draw for visitors each year. So let’s take a walk through Silverton to check out the murals we came across.. in no particular order ..

Silver Falls – City of the Falls

Silverton photographer June Drake apparently helped to perserve Silver Falls State Park , which includes more than 8,000 acres and 10 waterfalls. This is where we camped for 2 nights.

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Voodoo Doughnuts

I mentioned in a #POTD earlier this week that we’d gone to Voodoo in Portland. The line outside was long and the sun was blazing – two things to quickly make me very cranky. But I had high hopes after reading so many good reviews online, and decided that it had to be worth the wait.

Once we finally made our way to the doors, I realised that there was a line snaking around the store. Thankfully it was out of the sunshine though.

After much humming and hawing, we each selected 2 donuts..

(Yes, I know I spell it differently to Voodoo.. but both are correct.. ahem)

Blueberry Cake and Dirt for me, and Voodoo Doll and plain glazed for James. I carried that bright pink box through town like it was precious cargo and looked forward to trying them later that day when we arrived at Silver Fall State Park campground.

I supposed you’d like to see the donuts?

Drum roll, please..

Verdict? Don’t believe the hype!

The two top donuts (Dirt and Voodoo Doll) were really good. The others weren’t. Would I stand in line like that again, when we have better donut options back home? That would be an hard pass.

But I’m happy to say that we’ve been, and have checked it off the list.

Have you been to Voodoo? If so, what are your thoughts?

Bon Appetit!

Marla