Victoria’s Moss Lady

We’ve just returned from several days away in Victoria, where we celebrated our one year wedding anniversary. Near to our hotel is the popular Beacon Hill, a 75 hectare park popular with locals and visitors alike.

Short on time, we weren’t able to see much other than this impressive art piece aptly named Moss Lady.

Created by gardener Dale Doebert, and a team of Victoria city employees, Moss Lady is tucked away in a shaded area of Beacon Hill Park.

At approximately 11 metres, she’s made of a mix comprised of boulders, cement, chicken wire, metal piping, clay-based soil and locally sourced cat-tail and club moss. Her “hair” is flowering crocosmia plants.

I particularly enjoyed Moss Lady, and the dreary weather certainly added to the experience.

While we intentionally sought her out, I can’t help but laugh when imagining how startling it would be to be wandering through the park minding your own business when you turn a corner and BAM, you’re face to face with a giant coming out of the ground.

The Meditation

Times are scary. Unpredictable and stifling with a dose of terror. Many people are turning to different types of self care to offset the negativity.

Like meditation, for example.

Personally, meditation hasn’t ever worked for me. My brain hasn’t figured out how to shut up.

Continue reading “The Meditation”

La Foule

One of the many works of art you’ll wander past as you stroll through the Paris’ Jardin des Tuileries is La Foule, or The Crowd. This bronze sculpture was created by English-born, Paris-based painter sculptor, Raymond Mason, back in the mid-1960′.

It was later purchased by France’s National Fund of Contemporary Art, before being installed in the park in 2000.

As you can see, the sculpture takes the form of a number of human figures clumped together in a tight pattern.

I wonder what this guy would say if he could speak. With the way he’s crammed in tight next to his neighbours, it reminds me of my daily commute home on the train surrounded by people with questionable hygiene. Poor guy, I feel your pain.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Les Deux Plateaux

I woke early one morning (not difficult to do when suffering through jetlag), ate my breakfast and hurriedly left my hotel. I was headed for the Palais Royale. Or more specifically, to its inner courtyard, Cour d’Honneur. My goal was to arrive before every Instagrammer in the city did because I wanted to take some people-less photos.

Photos of what? you might be asking yourself.

Several months before the trip I’d seen an art installation in an online travel guide for Paris that looked pretty neat, and decided to check it out myself.

Within the courtyard are 260 striped columns of varying heights, and I was interested to see the contrast between them and the classical design of the former 17th century Royal palace.

Les Deux Plateaux (or The Two Trays in English) are more commonly known as the Colonnes de Buren. Installed by French artist Daniel Buren in 1986, the columns proved to be highly controversial and not loved by all. Each is made of Carrara and Pyrenean marble, which was also famously used by famous sculptors such as Michelangelo and Rodin.

I enjoyed the installation, and after a quick look and a few photos I noticed that others were starting to arrive. I knew I was short on time when I spied a girl posing atop a column with an outfit coordinated with the stripes. So I took a quick selfie and made my way to my next stop for the morning.

Unintentionally dressed in stripes to match, I swear!

Bonne journée!

Marla