Thursday Doors – Saint-Savin

This week’s door is from Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe in Saint-Savin, France. The church, a recognised UNESCO World Heritage site, is famed for biblical themed murals – many which date back to the late 11th Century. Just like last week’s door, this one caught my eye not for the door itself but because of its impressive […]

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Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Murals, Part 1

As I mentioned yesterday, Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe received UNESCO World Heritage status in 1983. The Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is a masterpiece of the murals of the 11th and 12th centuries. Its outstanding character is due to its extraordinary decor, testimony to the art of representing and painting in western Christian medieval civilization. – UNESCO

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Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Thank you to everyone who voted yesterday. The winner by a landslide is, “Look up!”. So today I’m going to share with you a beautifully decorated church in France. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is often referred to as the Romanesque Sistine Chapel because of its impressive murals (many […]

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Musée des 24 Heures du Mans

My boyfriend is a car guy, both by nature and profession. So stopping at le Mans 24 Hour Museum during our trip to France seemed like the right thing to do.

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Hotel Trianon

On the upper level of Le Tréport, we noticed these stairs. They looked out of place, surrounded by a stunning vista but seemingly going nowhere. It turns out that they were once part of Hotel Trianon, a grand hotel turned WW1 British Military Hospital. Later, during WW11 the German forces bombed the site. All that […]

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My Feet At ..

Check out my full post about this impressive monument, showcasing contributions made by French citizens throughout history. Bonne journée! Marla I’ve accumulated a large (admittedly random) collection of photos of my feet taken during my travels. I thought it might be fun to occasionally share them here on MOTM and link each photo to a […]

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Fire!

It was September 16th of the year 1868, and a long hot Summer day in the gold rush town of Barkerville. According to the story passed from one generation to the next, that afternoon saw a man make an unwanted move on a woman at the back of Adler and Berry’s New Fashion Saloon. A […]

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Barkerville Post Office

Because the old Gold Rush town of Barkerville was so remote, its residents struggled to keep correspondence up with loved ones back home. Initially letters were sent with friends traveling between Victoria and nearby Quesnel. It wasn’t very reliable, and I imagine it didn’t help with feelings of homesickness.

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Dr. Hugh Watt

Dr. Wyatt, great-grandson of James Watt (he patented the steam engine) moved to Barkerville with his wife in 1882 where they set up house.

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Nicol Hotel Museum

Not unlike modern times, the buildings and properties of Barkerville were regularly bought and sold taking on different forms. The history of a single building can often make you dizzy with its twists and turns.

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John Bibby’s Tin Shop

Because Barkerville is so remote (even today the nearest city is over an hour’s drive away), much of the necessary supplies were produced onsite. A real community was built by craftsmen looking for a way to create a living for themselves while providing the products and services the citizens would need for their daily lives.

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A Place to Lay Your Head

At its peak during the mid 1860’s, the town of Barkerville was home to approximately 5000 people. Much of its population was in town temporarily, hoping to get rich quick before leaving with pockets full of gold.

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Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver

Back in the 1950s, Vancouver was home to more neon than Las Vegas. We had a staggering 19,000 neon signs .. 1 for every 18 people at the time!

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