l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Statues

Today we’ll take a look at statues on display at l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe. I’m not religious – or knowledgeable on Christian figures – but I enjoyed each these figures. Each is featured in its own alcove, surrounded by painted brick effect, and lit by light coming in through beautiful stained glass windows.

Continue reading “l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Statues”

Thursday Doors – Saint-Savin

This week’s door is from Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe in Saint-Savin, France.

The church, a recognised UNESCO World Heritage site, is famed for biblical themed murals – many which date back to the late 11th Century.

Just like last week’s door, this one caught my eye not for the door itself but because of its impressive surround.

Bonne journée!

Marla


Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments section over at Norm’s blog, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Murals, Part 1

As I mentioned yesterday, Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe received UNESCO World Heritage status in 1983.

The Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is a masterpiece of the murals of the 11th and 12th centuries. Its outstanding character is due to its extraordinary decor, testimony to the art of representing and painting in western Christian medieval civilization.

– UNESCO

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Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Thank you to everyone who voted yesterday. The winner by a landslide is, “Look up!”.

So today I’m going to share with you a beautifully decorated church in France. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is often referred to as the Romanesque Sistine Chapel because of its impressive murals (many of which are on the church’s ceiling).

Hence the Look up!

But before we head inside, let’s take a wander to appreciate the exterior of the church.

The history is a bit unclear to me but the story goes that it was originally founded under the rule of Charlamagne. The bodies of two 5th Century martyrs, Savin and Cyprian, were discovered and a church was built above their crypt to protect these Holy relics.

The church was later rebuilt in the 11th Century, expanded in the 13th Century and the spire we see here was added during the 14th Century.

The building is very imposing, and made me feel quite small in comparison.

The rear of property runs along a portion of the River Gartempe, separated by an impressively old stone wall. It’s also home to a vegetable garden and a selection of fruit trees.

I think it’s time we head inside to see what really brought us here. Oui?

I take A LOT of photos, so it’s not uncommon to find James relaxing somewhere while he waits for me.

See you tomorrow!

Bonne journée!

Marla

Hotel Trianon

On the upper level of Le Tréport, we noticed these stairs. They looked out of place, surrounded by a stunning vista but seemingly going nowhere.

It turns out that they were once part of Hotel Trianon, a grand hotel turned WW1 British Military Hospital. Later, during WW11 the German forces bombed the site. All that was left are the stairs we see today.

Here are some photos I took of display boards, to help imagine how the site looked decades ago.

Bonne journée!

Marla

My Feet At ..

Check out my full post about this impressive monument, showcasing contributions made by French citizens throughout history.

Bonne journée!

Marla


I’ve accumulated a large (admittedly random) collection of photos of my feet taken during my travels. I thought it might be fun to occasionally share them here on MOTM and link each photo to a more in-depth post I’ve previously published.

Fire!

It was September 16th of the year 1868, and a long hot Summer day in the gold rush town of Barkerville. According to the story passed from one generation to the next, that afternoon saw a man make an unwanted move on a woman at the back of Adler and Berry’s New Fashion Saloon. A scuffle ensued and a stovepipe was knocked over, resulting in a fire. Within minutes the town of Barkerville was in flames.

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Barkerville Post Office

Because the old Gold Rush town of Barkerville was so remote, its residents struggled to keep correspondence up with loved ones back home. Initially letters were sent with friends traveling between Victoria and nearby Quesnel. It wasn’t very reliable, and I imagine it didn’t help with feelings of homesickness.

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John Bibby’s Tin Shop

Because Barkerville is so remote (even today the nearest city is over an hour’s drive away), much of the necessary supplies were produced onsite. A real community was built by craftsmen looking for a way to create a living for themselves while providing the products and services the citizens would need for their daily lives.

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