What is a Weekend?

Are you familiar with the scene in Downton Abbey where Dame Maggie Smith’s character asks, “What is a weekend?”? Her delivery is perfection.

While the scene touches on the ‘modern’ invention of leisure time (for the period), not to mention the obvious class distinction between floors, I can’t help but ask myself that very question this morning.

What is a weekend?

As many of you will know, I’m currently working from home. Our apartment is tiny, not unlike most in Downtown Vancouver. My makeshift desk is set up 2 metres from our bed. It’s also 2 metres from our couch. I’ve only just realised the irony in the spacing.

Because we’re in voluntary lockdown, practicing social distancing when we pop out for necessities, I’m basically stuck in the same space 7 days a week. One day blends into the next. Weekdays turn into weekends without any noticeable change.

My question to those working from home as well, what are you doing to mark your weekend? What helps you to feel like you’re not stuck on an hamster wheel 24/7? If you have any suggestions, please comment below.

I thought I’d share some photos of flowers I snapped during a lunchtime stroll earlier this week. I forced myself to get out for some fresh air and sunshine. If you’re permitted to do the same where you are, I highly recommend it.

Spring has finally sprung!

Bonne journée!

Marls

Monet at Giverny

I won’t pretend to be knowledgeable about art. I mean, I can tell the difference between impressionism, cubism and surrealism. But if you were to start discussing post-impressionism in great detail or ask for my opinion on baroque, I’d probably look for a polite excuse to escape before my eyes dried up and fell at your feet.

Continue reading “Monet at Giverny”

The Oregon Garden

We visited the Oregon Garden earlier this week for a wander through the enormous grounds (80 acres!).

I’ve split my photos into 2 groups, and today we’ll start with the first.. it’s more muted than tomorrow’s group, but the plants and flowers are nowhere less beautiful.

I’m not sure what the above pod is, but the next photo shows what it looks like when they open up. They remind me of dandelions.

The Dogwood is the floral emblem of our province, British Columbia. I love its clean simplicity.

Anyone know what this is? I thought perhaps that it was a walnut, but I think the “pod” of walnuts are more shiny and less velvety?

Have you ever visited the Oregon Garden? If so, what did you think?

Bonne journée!

Marla

Roses and The Petite Cannon

Walking further into the grounds of the Palais Royale, you’ll find yourself surrounded by gorgeous roses. Or you will if you’re lucky like I was, and unintentionally time your visit with their bloom season.

And if you look closely, you’ll notice a small cannon installed on one of the lawns between the rows of rose bushes.

According to French Centre of National Monuments, “The meridian cannon of the Palais-Royal was designed by Sieur Rousseau, a watchmaker at the 95 of the Beaujolais Gallery in 1786.

The bronze cannon installed on the meridian line of Paris thundered at noon , thanks to a magnifying glass that caused the firing of the wick on sunny days.

Regarded as the best in Paris, the little gun attracted a large audience who came to adjust his watch.”

The gun was stolen in 1998, so what you see in the image above is actually a replica that was installed in the original’s place in 2002.

I love stumbling across random bits of history like this!

Bonne journée!

Marla