Paris Street Art: Rue de Seine

Konny Streding is a popular urban contemporary artist originally hailing from Berlin. Her works can be found across Paris and regularly feature women. The technique, called paste ups (or wheat-pastes), has been discussed here on MOTM before and you’ll probably recall my post on Lavalet.

If you’re interested in seeing more of Konny’s works, check out her website.

Victoria’s Moss Lady

We’ve just returned from several days away in Victoria, where we celebrated our one year wedding anniversary. Near to our hotel is the popular Beacon Hill, a 75 hectare park popular with locals and visitors alike.

Short on time, we weren’t able to see much other than this impressive art piece aptly named Moss Lady.

Created by gardener Dale Doebert, and a team of Victoria city employees, Moss Lady is tucked away in a shaded area of Beacon Hill Park.

At approximately 11 metres, she’s made of a mix comprised of boulders, cement, chicken wire, metal piping, clay-based soil and locally sourced cat-tail and club moss. Her “hair” is flowering crocosmia plants.

I particularly enjoyed Moss Lady, and the dreary weather certainly added to the experience.

While we intentionally sought her out, I can’t help but laugh when imagining how startling it would be to be wandering through the park minding your own business when you turn a corner and BAM, you’re face to face with a giant coming out of the ground.

Abbotsford Murals

Commonly known for being home to the popular Abbotsford Airshow, as well as cheap gas prices, I recently discovered that Abbotsford is also home to a small collection of brightly coloured murals decorating the city’s historic centre. Naturally I dragged my husband on a walk so I could snap some photos.

Created by non-profit, I-Lead Abby, this mural is said to represent openness (henna) and the city’s Indo-Canadian community, as well as growth (lotus flowers).

From artist Tara-Lynn Kozma-Perrin: “Before colonization, two streams used to converge in the area where the mural is today. The patterns in the mural resemble fish scales and reed mats which pay homage to the history of the land and its Indigenous inhabitants.”

A timely reminder to all of us.

From lead artist Sean Karemaker: “Nature continues to humble us. As a species, humans must realize we are completely interconnected with the entire ecosystem.”
The large mural depicts how everything in the natural world is connected, from sea to sky, mountains to tiny mushrooms, furry critters to lush groves.

Strangely I wasn’t able to find any information on this large mural, so I can’t share any additional insight.

This mural was at the centre of controversy earlier this Summer. Prior to public outrage, and subsequent rework, it included the quote, “Make Abbotsford great again.”. Many found it to be an unsavory choice given its similarity to one of a “certain soggy Cheeto’s” favourite sayings.

Artist Ericka Walker worked closely with members of the Royal Canadian Legion (Abbotsford Branch #15) to create this 60′ mural. Many reasons is meant to encourage thought and dialogue about the countless factors surrounding war. For example, reasons to enlist, or not. Reasons to commemorate or be critical of war efforts.

Some businesses got into the spirit with their own murals, like this one next to the entrance of Sound of Music Sales.

Karl’s Meats is a family-run local Dutch delicatessen and butcher shop. Hence the wooden clogs in the window.

Another music themed mural, this one on the side of Temple Music Academy.

The historical centre of Abbotsford is really cute, and I’m hoping to visit again in the near future to check out some of the local businesses.

Paris Street Art – Rue de Louvre

During my most recent trip to Paris, I decided that I’d finally check out illustrious E. Dehillerin. For those unaware, E. Dehillerin sell cooking supplies. It’s got 2 floors jam packed with kitchen items that you’ll likely never have a need to use them at home. For someone who loves to hoard kitchen toys (guilty as charged!), it’s heaven on Earth. I’m working on a post to sum up my visit .. hopefully it will be ready later this week. Continue reading “Paris Street Art – Rue de Louvre”

Vaux-le-Vicomte, The Room with All the Gold

I’ve completely lost track of what each room is at Vaux-le-Vicomte. Normally I can find the information in brochures I’ve held onto and bulk it up with help from online. Unfortunately I can’t find any papers in my stash and details for Vaux-le-Vicomte online are limited.

Continue reading “Vaux-le-Vicomte, The Room with All the Gold”

Vaux-le-Vicomte, The Dining Room

The fanciest of dining rooms I’ve ever had the pleasure of eating in have been at nice restaurants or hotels. At the time, I marveled at the decor of each location. But none of them could compare to sitting down for dinner in the dining room at Vaux-le-Vicomte.

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Just imagine being a guest here. Where would your eyes land? There’s so much to take on and you’d know that you were in for a treat.

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The large mirrors play a trick on your eyes, making the room feel much larger than it really is.

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James just looked over my shoulder as I’m proofing this post, and asked why I don’t decorate our place like this. That sounds like an absolute dream but I wouldn’t even know where to start.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Vaux-le-Vicomte, Looking Up

I took a lot of photos during my visit to Vaux-le-Vicomte. Of course I did. So many, in fact, that I’m feeling a little overwhelmed with where to start. I have decided that looking up is as good of a place as any, and am sharing an assortment of ceiling photos.

If I’ve learned anything from the amount of times I’ve walked away with a kink in my neck, it’s that these fancy French chateaux rarely have a surface untouched.

Bonne journée!

Marla

North Vancouver Street Art – Lonsdale Quay

Along an exterior wall at North Vancouver’s Lonsdale Quay Market you’ll find a 100 foot long mural titled Coastal Energy.

Designed by local students and painted by artist Dennis Creighton, Coastal Energy is part of a city-wide series of public art called Studio in the City.

Its purpose is to give local youth the opportunity to apprentice in the arts, while working on various canvases throughout North Vancouver.

If you’ve visited Vancouver as a tourist, chances are you’ve seen this mural. Lonsdale Quay is often a stop on visitor’s lists of local places to check out.

Bonne journée!

Marla

G is for .. Stained Glass

G is for Glass. Stained glass. Said like a certain famous fictional spy who likes his favourite beverage shaken, not stirred.

Yes, that’s right. In this installment of my Alphabet series, we’re headed to Reims to visit Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Reims.

Continue reading “G is for .. Stained Glass”

l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Statues

Today we’ll take a look at statues on display at l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe. I’m not religious – or knowledgeable on Christian figures – but I enjoyed each these figures. Each is featured in its own alcove, surrounded by painted brick effect, and lit by light coming in through beautiful stained glass windows.

Continue reading “l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Statues”

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Murals, Part 1

As I mentioned yesterday, Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe received UNESCO World Heritage status in 1983.

The Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is a masterpiece of the murals of the 11th and 12th centuries. Its outstanding character is due to its extraordinary decor, testimony to the art of representing and painting in western Christian medieval civilization.

– UNESCO

Continue reading “Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Murals, Part 1”

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Thank you to everyone who voted yesterday. The winner by a landslide is, “Look up!”.

So today I’m going to share with you a beautifully decorated church in France. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is often referred to as the Romanesque Sistine Chapel because of its impressive murals (many of which are on the church’s ceiling).

Hence the Look up!

But before we head inside, let’s take a wander to appreciate the exterior of the church.

The history is a bit unclear to me but the story goes that it was originally founded under the rule of Charlamagne. The bodies of two 5th Century martyrs, Savin and Cyprian, were discovered and a church was built above their crypt to protect these Holy relics.

The church was later rebuilt in the 11th Century, expanded in the 13th Century and the spire we see here was added during the 14th Century.

The building is very imposing, and made me feel quite small in comparison.

The rear of property runs along a portion of the River Gartempe, separated by an impressively old stone wall. It’s also home to a vegetable garden and a selection of fruit trees.

I think it’s time we head inside to see what really brought us here. Oui?

I take A LOT of photos, so it’s not uncommon to find James relaxing somewhere while he waits for me.

See you tomorrow!

Bonne journée!

Marla