Thursday Doors – Victoria

This week we’re taking a look at a couple of doors at Hatley Castle, a National Historic Site located on the grounds of Royal Roads University.

The property of this historic site includes several buildings and formal gardens, as well as first and second-growth forest where one can find large Douglas fir and western red cedar.

Unfortunately, at the time of our visit we were unable to tour the interior or visit the gardens. But that’s fine, because the entrance and exterior were worth the stop.

The first door we’ll look at is at the covered main entrance. There are several things going on, from the old iron hinges to the decorative archway with its faces.

Here’s a closer look at the intricately detailed door handles, and the borderline creepy door bell panel.

The second door feels a bit like a secret, hidden back from the main facade of the castle and up a few stairs.

I like the mix of stained glass, carved wood and impressive handle.

Fun fact..

Hatley Castle is a popular location for filming, and has been used in many movies and television programs – Spider Man, X-Men, The Professor, Smallville, Supernatural, MacGyver.. just to name a few.

Have you visited Hatley Castle? Comments below.


Thursday Doors is a weekly event facilitated by Dan. If you’re interested in participating, check out Dan’s blog.

Thursday Doors – Paris

This week we’re in Paris at Hôtel de Ville, or City Hall, which houses the city’s local administration. The building itself is striking, but I’m happy to focus on a couple of entrances today.

Look at this beauty, with its intricate iron work, glass and ornate gold touches. This is the door used by staff (at least early the morning I visited), and you can see a bit of the security scanner just inside.

And here’s the official main entrance with its beautiful engravings.

The inscription carved above the door reads, “In this place, September 4, 1870, the people of Paris proclaimed the Republic.”, referencing the Siege of Paris.

Hopefully one day I’ll be able to visit the inside of Hôtel de Ville, as I’ve heard that the function room was built to replicate the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles. Which reminds me to add it to my ever-growing list of places in Paris I want to check out.


Thursday Doors is a weekly event facilitated by Dan. If you’re interested in participating, check out Dan’s blog.

Thursday Doors – Provins

It feels like it’s been forever since I last took part in Thursday Doors. So long, in fact, that Norm has passed the torch over to Dan, who now facilitates this fun weekly event. If you’re interested in participating, check out Dan’s blog.

This week we’re in Provins, a picturesque medieval town just over an hour from Paris by train. The town is split into two parts, an upper and lower. It’s up on the hill that you’ll find Eglise Saint-Quiriace (Saint-Quiriace collegiate church). Here’s the main entrance.

I particularly enjoy the stone carving above the doors.

Unlike most churches I’ve visited in France, Eglise Saint-Quiriace sits mostly empty. But with a bit of imagination, it’s easy to picture what it would have looked like buzzing with people.

Construction of this church began during the 12th century, but it was never completed due to finances (or lack thereof). The 17th century saw a dome added to its roof, with people living in the nearby area then known as “the children of the dome”. Erm.

Outside is a plaque referencing Jean d’Arc attending mass with King Charles VII. The two had been in Reims for his consecration, and stopped in at Eglise Saint-Quiriace on their way through town.

I didn’t spend nearly enough time in Provins. It definitely justifies a proper visit, and look forward to returning one day. Have you been? Any suggestions for when I make it back?

Thursday Doors – Paris

Fun fact: today is my birthday!

To celebrate, I’ve taken the day off from working from home and will pretend that I’m in Paris.

A Parisian Pandemic Birthday!

So it’s only fitting that this week’s door be in Paris. I considered going with a gorgeous and ornate door, but I chose this one instead. Because there is beauty to be found all around us, sometimes in the most unexpected ways. We just need to take the time to look for it.

I hope you are well, staying safe and enjoying the beauty around you.

Bonne journée!

Marla


Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments section over at Norm’s blog, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

Thursday Doors – Maincy

This week we’re in Maincy, at Vaux-le-Vicomte, again. I love this door and its surround. It feels to me that great things are on the other side. Like a magical world full pastries, strong tea, soft music and lots and lots of fluffy kittens.

Bonne journée!

Marla


Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments section over at Norm’s blog, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

Vaux-le-Vicomte – Dome with a View

Located at the back of the Chateau is an impressive dome that towers above you at an height of 25 metres. Climbing to its top provides a 360° view around the expansive estate.

In order to climb the tower, I had to pay an additional 3€ at it’s entrance. The woman collecting money looked down at my walking cast and seemed concerned that I wouldn’t make it up the stairs. Feeling quite confident, I assured her that I had been traipsing around Paris and would be fine.

Of course, as soon as I saw the stairs themselves I questioned my bravado.

What the hell had I got myself into?

I took my time, stopping along the way and forcing myself to not look down. Aside from my injured foot, I’m actually quite scared of heights.

When I had finally reached the top I turned around to look back where I came from. Truth be told, I was dreading heading back down the rickety stairs.

But the view of the gardens more than made up for my white knuckles experience. The tiered gardens stretch outwards for near 3 km and are self watered by canals.

The swirly design on the grass in the foreground is an art installation called, Ephemeral Ribbons, by Patrick Hourcade. They take the place of the previous boxwood hedges that were destroyed by disease.

If memory serves correct, I believe that the owners of Vaux-le-Vicomte live in the building in the distance.

One last look up towards the sky before I headed for the stairs

With trepidation, and an hand firmly grasping the railing, I made my way safely back down

Check back tomorrow to start the tour of the Château’s jaw dropping interior.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Bones

We’ve taken a look at the exterior, as well as the famed murals, of Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe in previous posts. Today I’ve decided to share some photos that I took of the bones of the church. By that, I mean architectural pieces that I found to be interesting. Sorry to anyone hoping to see real bones.

Continue reading “Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Bones”

Thursday Doors – Chantilly

I know, I know. My contribution to Thursday Doors last week was also from Château de Chantilly. But this week’s door is different, and you’ll soon see why I wanted to share it.

While last week’s door was over the top shiny and gold, understandably not to everyone’s taste, this week’s is more natural.

I immediately noticed the carving, with the crown and Fleur de Lys (which is pretty standard for French Châteaux in my experience).

But another feature I really liked was the door’s hardware.

(Eek.. sorry for the blurriness)

Aren’t they lovely with their intricate details? If I wasn’t feeling so lazy right now, I’d get up and take a photo of the door to our apartment to share as comparison. It’s depressingly boring and drab. Le sigh.

Tomorrow I’ve got the third Alphabet series post scheduled to be published, but will be back the day after that with more Château de Chantilly. Until then..

Bonne journée!

Marla

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments section over at Norm’s blog, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

Gordon House

Late last week I saw an headline about a Frank Lloyd Wright house being acquired by a museum in New Hampshire, in the United States.

For those not familiar with Mr. Wright, he made a name for himself by (among many things) being an innovative architect who’s design focused on bridging humans and our natural surroundings – which makes that recent headline exciting for fans of his work and those interested in architecture.

For me, it reminded me that James and I unintentionally stumbled upon a FLW house in September and I still hadn’t posted about it!

Do you remember my posts about The Oregon Garden near Silverton a couple of months ago? If not, and you like flowers, you can find the posts here and here.

Anyway, on the edge of the garden property sits The Gordon House which is the only FLW house in the state. Because we a) didn’t know of its existence and therefore, b) didn’t prebook a tour, we were left to wander the grounds outside of the house.

It was eerily quiet. There wasn’t anyone else around and it felt like we shouldn’t be there. Do you ever get that sensation that you’re being watched? That’s how I felt.

The pathway was a carpet made of hazelnut shells, which was strangely satisfying to walk on.

Although I had seen a couple of figures in one of the windows, I decided to chance getting shooed away for a closer look and headed up the long driveway.

I decided to walk straight up to the entrance for a peek inside. What I wasn’t expecting was to interrupt a tour. After a very quick snap, I turned and quickly hurried back down the driveway.

I’ve spent most of my adult life wanting to visit a FLW property. It’s weird then that after all this time it felt a little letdown. Perhaps if we’re in the area ever again, I’ll plan ahead and book a tour. Surely being able to see the interior would improve the experience?

Have you ever been up close and experienced a Frank Lloyd Wright house?

Bonne journée!

Marla