Thursday Doors – Saint-Savin

This week’s door is from Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe in Saint-Savin, France.

The church, a recognised UNESCO World Heritage site, is famed for biblical themed murals – many which date back to the late 11th Century.

Just like last week’s door, this one caught my eye not for the door itself but because of its impressive surround.

Bonne journée!

Marla


Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments section over at Norm’s blog, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Bones

We’ve taken a look at the exterior, as well as the famed murals, of Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe in previous posts. Today I’ve decided to share some photos that I took of the bones of the church. By that, I mean architectural pieces that I found to be interesting. Sorry to anyone hoping to see real bones.

Continue reading “Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Bones”

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Murals, Part 1

As I mentioned yesterday, Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe received UNESCO World Heritage status in 1983.

The Abbey Church of Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is a masterpiece of the murals of the 11th and 12th centuries. Its outstanding character is due to its extraordinary decor, testimony to the art of representing and painting in western Christian medieval civilization.

– UNESCO

Continue reading “Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe – The Murals, Part 1”

Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Thank you to everyone who voted yesterday. The winner by a landslide is, “Look up!”.

So today I’m going to share with you a beautifully decorated church in France. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is often referred to as the Romanesque Sistine Chapel because of its impressive murals (many of which are on the church’s ceiling).

Hence the Look up!

But before we head inside, let’s take a wander to appreciate the exterior of the church.

The history is a bit unclear to me but the story goes that it was originally founded under the rule of Charlamagne. The bodies of two 5th Century martyrs, Savin and Cyprian, were discovered and a church was built above their crypt to protect these Holy relics.

The church was later rebuilt in the 11th Century, expanded in the 13th Century and the spire we see here was added during the 14th Century.

The building is very imposing, and made me feel quite small in comparison.

The rear of property runs along a portion of the River Gartempe, separated by an impressively old stone wall. It’s also home to a vegetable garden and a selection of fruit trees.

I think it’s time we head inside to see what really brought us here. Oui?

I take A LOT of photos, so it’s not uncommon to find James relaxing somewhere while he waits for me.

See you tomorrow!

Bonne journée!

Marla

Mr. Burned Corn

Dr. Bonnie Henry, the British Columbia Officer of Public Health, announced today that we’re looking at another month of COVID-19 related restrictions. I can deal with that. Another month of staying home except for quick trips out for more essentials, or for sanity breaks in the fresh air – it’s important and necessary.

Continue reading “Mr. Burned Corn”

Chauvigny

Chauvigny, a medieval clifftop town overlooking the Vienne river, boasts not 1 but 5 châteaux. It’s also important for Roman architecture; the Saint Pierre Collegiate Church (12th Century) with its famous sculptured chapels and painted columns, the Notre-Dame Church (12th Century) and the Saint-Pierre-des-Eglises with its pre-Romanesque murals.

Continue reading “Chauvigny”

Thursday Doors – Paris

This week’s post isn’t so much about doors themselves, but instead what I found on some doors in Paris. While making my way from Jardin du Luxembourg back to my hotel, I came across these little cuties. Of course I had to stop to take photos.

wp-1586388572249610872510543042003.jpg

The accompanying business was closed, so I wasn’t sure what the images were supposed to be telling me. Later, I googled the company name and discovered that La Maison de Poupee is a seller of collectible dolls.

wp-15863885726442480438929992956272.jpg

They’re only open by appointment. But go check out their website, which features an adorable chat.

Le miaou!

Marla


Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments section over at Norm’s blog, anytime between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

Hotel Trianon

On the upper level of Le Tréport, we noticed these stairs. They looked out of place, surrounded by a stunning vista but seemingly going nowhere.

It turns out that they were once part of Hotel Trianon, a grand hotel turned WW1 British Military Hospital. Later, during WW11 the German forces bombed the site. All that was left are the stairs we see today.

Here are some photos I took of display boards, to help imagine how the site looked decades ago.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Le Tréport Funiculaire

Take a (free) ride up or down Le Tréport’s funicular, which joins the upper and lower parts of the town. The ride, at less than 2 minutes, cuts through a tunnel in the cliff on a 155 metre long track.

I’m sure that fans of the Scandi-noir styled French cop drama Witnesses (or Les Témoins) will recognise the funicular.

I loved that program and really hope a third season is filmed. Fingers crossed.

Bonne journée!

Marla

What is a Weekend?

Are you familiar with the scene in Downton Abbey where Dame Maggie Smith’s character asks, “What is a weekend?”? Her delivery is perfection.

While the scene touches on the ‘modern’ invention of leisure time (for the period), not to mention the obvious class distinction between floors, I can’t help but ask myself that very question this morning.

What is a weekend?

As many of you will know, I’m currently working from home. Our apartment is tiny, not unlike most in Downtown Vancouver. My makeshift desk is set up 2 metres from our bed. It’s also 2 metres from our couch. I’ve only just realised the irony in the spacing.

Because we’re in voluntary lockdown, practicing social distancing when we pop out for necessities, I’m basically stuck in the same space 7 days a week. One day blends into the next. Weekdays turn into weekends without any noticeable change.

My question to those working from home as well, what are you doing to mark your weekend? What helps you to feel like you’re not stuck on an hamster wheel 24/7? If you have any suggestions, please comment below.

I thought I’d share some photos of flowers I snapped during a lunchtime stroll earlier this week. I forced myself to get out for some fresh air and sunshine. If you’re permitted to do the same where you are, I highly recommend it.

Spring has finally sprung!

Bonne journée!

Marls