Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe

Thank you to everyone who voted yesterday. The winner by a landslide is, “Look up!”.

So today I’m going to share with you a beautifully decorated church in France. Designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, l’Abbaye de Saint-Savin-sur-Gartempe is often referred to as the Romanesque Sistine Chapel because of its impressive murals (many of which are on the church’s ceiling).

Hence the Look up!

But before we head inside, let’s take a wander to appreciate the exterior of the church.

The history is a bit unclear to me but the story goes that it was originally founded under the rule of Charlamagne. The bodies of two 5th Century martyrs, Savin and Cyprian, were discovered and a church was built above their crypt to protect these Holy relics.

The church was later rebuilt in the 11th Century, expanded in the 13th Century and the spire we see here was added during the 14th Century.

The building is very imposing, and made me feel quite small in comparison.

The rear of property runs along a portion of the River Gartempe, separated by an impressively old stone wall. It’s also home to a vegetable garden and a selection of fruit trees.

I think it’s time we head inside to see what really brought us here. Oui?

I take A LOT of photos, so it’s not uncommon to find James relaxing somewhere while he waits for me.

See you tomorrow!

Bonne journée!

Marla

Mr. Burned Corn

Dr. Bonnie Henry, the British Columbia Officer of Public Health, announced today that we’re looking at another month of COVID-19 related restrictions. I can deal with that. Another month of staying home except for quick trips out for more essentials, or for sanity breaks in the fresh air – it’s important and necessary.

Continue reading “Mr. Burned Corn”

Chauvigny

Chauvigny, a medieval clifftop town overlooking the Vienne river, boasts not 1 but 5 châteaux. It’s also important for Roman architecture; the Saint Pierre Collegiate Church (12th Century) with its famous sculptured chapels and painted columns, the Notre-Dame Church (12th Century) and the Saint-Pierre-des-Eglises with its pre-Romanesque murals.

Continue reading “Chauvigny”

Hotel Trianon

On the upper level of Le Tréport, we noticed these stairs. They looked out of place, surrounded by a stunning vista but seemingly going nowhere.

It turns out that they were once part of Hotel Trianon, a grand hotel turned WW1 British Military Hospital. Later, during WW11 the German forces bombed the site. All that was left are the stairs we see today.

Here are some photos I took of display boards, to help imagine how the site looked decades ago.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Le Tréport Funiculaire

Take a (free) ride up or down Le Tréport’s funicular, which joins the upper and lower parts of the town. The ride, at less than 2 minutes, cuts through a tunnel in the cliff on a 155 metre long track.

I’m sure that fans of the Scandi-noir styled French cop drama Witnesses (or Les Témoins) will recognise the funicular.

I loved that program and really hope a third season is filmed. Fingers crossed.

Bonne journée!

Marla

Musée Marmottan Monet

For any fan of Claude Monet’s work, or Impressionism art in general, I recommend a visit to Musée Marmottan Monet in Paris’ 16th arrondissement.

While it’s a little further out from the city centre, I found it to be well worth the minimal effort it took me to get there.

I was sporting a very unfashionable walking cast during my visit, which made traipsing around town very interesting, but I would do it again in an heartbeat. The wearing of the boot – not the injury – of course.

There is, after all, nowhere else in the world that can boast the largest collection of Monet pieces!

The chair on the background has some seriously cool detailing. Here’s a closer shot.

In addition to housing 100 of Monet’s masterpieces, the Marmottan also features numerous works from the artist’s personal collection (Sisley, Degas and Gauguin to name a few).

The museum is housed in what was once an old hunting lodge owned by a Duke.

Oooh, what’s on that table? (Hobbles over in cumbersome walking cast to get a better look..)

Upon the Duke’s death, he left the property and his impressive collection of Impressionist pieces to the French Academy of Fine Arts.

Let’s take a closer look at that table.

One of Monet’s sons rounded out the collection by adding many of his Father’s personally owned pieces.

See anything familiar?

The museum is a treat not only for the paintings, but the vast number of other pieces. I’ve shared just a sampling of these that I found myself drooling over.

Bonne journée!

Marla

My Feet At ..

Check out my full post about this impressive monument, showcasing contributions made by French citizens throughout history.

Bonne journée!

Marla


I’ve accumulated a large (admittedly random) collection of photos of my feet taken during my travels. I thought it might be fun to occasionally share them here on MOTM and link each photo to a more in-depth post I’ve previously published.

Thursday Doors – Beynac-et-Cazenac

It’s days like today that I’m extra thankful for our home. It’s the one place where I can relax and feel safe while blocking out the craziness – and a certain virus – at the door. I’m sure that I’m not alone in this.

Continue reading “Thursday Doors – Beynac-et-Cazenac”

The Meditation

Times are scary. Unpredictable and stifling with a dose of terror. Many people are turning to different types of self care to offset the negativity.

Like meditation, for example.

Personally, meditation hasn’t ever worked for me. My brain hasn’t figured out how to shut up.

Continue reading “The Meditation”